Wednesday, 26 February 2014

2000AD Prog 1870

Prog 1870 Cover by Cliff Robinson & Dylan Teague

This fun cover by Cliff Robinson and Dylan Teague shows the aftermath of an encounter between Judge Dredd and a criminal, but where it really comes into its own is through the bullet point (pun intended!) narration of the various misdemeanours committed by the criminal. This litany of crimes helps fill in the blanks of what must have transpired between Dredd and the perp, giving some context to the artwork. It's a really clever cover, with a surprisingly subtle reference to the comic's 37th birthday when you add up all of the jail time accrued by the criminal. While I prefer the more overtly celebratory covers for the comic's anniversaries, this is a nice departure and shows a more cerebral approach.


JUDGE DREDD - SQUIRM! (Part 1)
Script - Michael Carroll
Art - Nick Dyer
Colours - Chris Blythe
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

I know it's due to the way 2000AD organises its scripting and that different writers work independently and the stories are slotted into the Prog based on a mixture of timing and completion, but it does feel a bit abrupt to be coming from a big storyline like 'Titan' into a more routine adventure, without any real sense of repercussions. I've heard that Rob Williams and Henry Flint are working on an epilogue to Titan, but it would have been nice to have some kind of transition between the stories. However, that said, I am a bit partial to a 'Fatties' story, after reading the 'Judge Dredd: Fatties' graphic novel which collected the best stories featuring the more rotund members of the Mega-City One population.


After making comparisons between the alien creature in Grey Area and H.G Giger's Alien chestbursters – this week's Dredd has an even more overt Giger-esque creature, which looks like a combination of the two stages in the Xenomorph's life. I really like the concept of a mutated tape-worm and the implication of some kind of sabotage amongst the Fatties involving surreptitious weight-loss with secret tapeworms. I also enjoyed the X-Factor parody in 'X-Fatter' with some familiar faces, especially the two-headed Ant and Dec. Congratulations to artist, Nick Dyer, for getting the two Geordie presenters the right way around – most of their core audience couldn't tell them apart!



FUTURE SHOCKS - IMMUNITY
Script - Eddie Robson
Art - John Burns
Letters - Ellie de Ville

This was a fantastic little Future Shock, vibrant with colour and the beautiful painted artwork of John Burns, which seemed to be even more polished and glossier than usual. I absolutely adored the design of the Tectuan ambassadors and their Sontaran-esque heads. I recognised the name of the script droid, Eddie Robson, but I couldn't quite place where from and then it hit me. He had scripted the Doctor Who audio adventure, Phobos, which I reviewed a few weeks back. 

As a Future Shock, the story was very effective – it managed to build a world and interesting characters within four pages, whilst throwing in a twist that I didn't see coming. The concept of twin planets from different dimensions was an interesting one and reminded me of how towns can be twinned with other towns in different countries. For any aspiring writers out there, this is a great example of how to construct your debut Future Shock!



THE A.B.C WARRIORS - RETURN TO MARS (Part 9)
Script - Pat Mills
Art - Clint Langley
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

This whole story-arc has felt like a slightly indulgent step into memory lane, as if Pat Mills has re-read his earlier work of Ro-Busters and the initial A.B.C. Warriors series and felt inspired by them to take some of his unresolved plot threads and characters (such as Happy Shrapnel and Howard Quartz) and revisit them with a more experienced eye. As someone who has recently read these classics for the first time, I admit that I have been enjoying this sojourn into A.B.C. Warrior history moreso than others may be, and this week's installment, which saw the robotic iteration of Howard Quartz (or "Mr 10 per cent", as he is also known) return to the series felt very climatic and seemed to be pushing the story off in a more interesting direction, as it did feel like it was meandering slightly since it had returned from its one week break.

It also seemed that the artwork was a lot clearer this week than it had been with the previous two installments, with a greater use of the lighting effects, especially with the blue tint in Tubal's eyes. I do like how Clint Langley has experimented with differing artistic styles during this story and I think that his more defined line-work, along with the hint of colour against the black and white, makes it the best drawn episode yet.



GREY AREA - RATES OF EXCHANGE (Part 2)
Script - Dan Abnett
Art - Patrick Goddard
Colours - Abigail Ryder
Letters - Ellie de Ville

It looks like my theory that the creatures had somehow borne themselves out of the currency was correct, although I was thinking more of a metaphorical birth through the money, rather than a literal 'eggs being used as currency' explanation. As I read this episode, it reminded me how perfect this series would be for a TV drama – it feels like it has the same morbid curiosity of TV shows like 'Nothing to Declare' with the opportunity to create some action-packed scenarios with science-fiction tropes.


The artwork by Patrick Goddard was spot-on. I loved the way he captured Birdy's jealousy when Bulliet was flirting with Lyra, and her satisfied grin once he kissed her in the midst of combat. His design of the creatures is fantastic and the final panel showing a horde of them prowling through the Grey Area manages to instil a true sense of tension and suspense for the next episode.



STRONTIUM DOG: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JOHNNY ALPHA - DOGS OF WAR (Part 10)
Script - John Wagner
Art - Carlos Ezquerra
Letters - Simon Bowland

Wow, that was a bit of a surprise ending! While it seemed like the plot was leading towards a sacrifice from either Middenface or Johnny, I don't think anyone actually expected it to happen, especially after the work that John Wagner had gone to by bringing the character back. The biggest question is where the series goes from here – we could revert back to the 'lost stories' format that had been utilised before the characters return, or we could move on and begin telling Strontium Dog stories focused on Middenface and the supporting cast, although I'm not sure how much interest the series could sustain without its lead character - after all, we've been there before.


They say that denial is the first stage of grief, but I severely doubt that Johnny Alpha died in that blast, especially with the minimal fanfare that the event received – he wasn't even featured on the front cover. Considering the recent developments with Judge Anderson over in the Judge Dredd Megazine, it could be that two of 2000AD's longest running characters have been killed off in a somewhat low-key manner, which doesn't quite ring true to me. While I doubt we've seen the last of both of those characters, it is somewhat worrying that each of them have 'prequel' series, which allows the comic to continue using them in stories without needing to reverse their 'deaths' anytime soon.



OVERALL THOUGHTS / NEXT WEEK:

Overall, this was a great birthday edition for 2000AD, which may (or may not) have included the (second) death of one of the comic's most beloved characters. I'm really enjoying all the strips, and I'm curious to see what replaces Strontium Dog until Prog 1874 - judging by the three Prog gap, it'll probably be one of Tharg's 3rillers! All of the strips are really hitting their stride and the addition of Future Shocks to the line-up ensures a varied read with every new issue until the jumping-on Prog.


The physical edition of 2000AD Prog 1870 will be available in stores on Wednesday 26th February - Digital copies of this Prog will be available on the same day through the 2000AD app, which can be downloaded onto iOS devices from here.

Keep checking back each week for more reviews and features about 2000AD, the Galaxy's Greatest Comic! Remember to leave your comments below, or contact me on Twitter or through my Facebook page!

Wednesday, 19 February 2014

2000AD Prog 1869

Prog 1869 Cover by Alex Ronald

I really love this realistic looking interpretation of Ulysses Sweet by Alex Ronald, which captures the horrifically gory appearance of the maniac-for-hire and his stapled-on face. The slight smile on his face as he stares directly at the reader is unsettling and captures the unpredictable nature of the psychopath assassin perfectly. I’d love to see Alex Ronald tackle the character in a full-sized story within the pages of the Prog, although Paul Marshall has done a top-notch job in depicting the character over the past nine weeks.


JUDGE DREDD - TITAN (Part 8)
Script - Rob Williams
Art - Henry Flint
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

The grand finale kicks off in epic style with Judges Dredd and Gerhart, both battle-scarred, fighting their way out of the chaos as Titan falls apart around them. After Nixon’s prolonged physical and mental torture of Dredd, she has one last trick up her sleeve as she watches him struggle with the decision to blow up the escaping shuttles or not. I really like the complex relationship between Gerhart and Dredd – he has saved the man’s life numerous times and even talks him out of committing murder, but he continues to want to see him brought to justice over his part in Chaos Day. It’s an interesting dynamic and I really look forward to seeing this plot point addressed in future episodes as the two continue to clash.


There is a nice change in the status quo with the Titan complex destroyed and its inmates now residing on the Saturn moon of Enceladus, claiming their own free sovereign state and effectively "beating" the Judges, but as Gerhart states, this is a battle for another day and sets up another on-going threat for the Justice department to be dealt with in future stories. 

Overall, Titan has been one of the more impressive Judge Dredd story-lines I've read in 2000AD in recent years, managing to capture a truly cinematic mood through Henry Flint's amazing artwork, alongside Rob Williams' fantastic script that combined continuity threads from Low Life and the Dredd universe and deftly set up the prospect of some very interesting tales in the future. I eagerly await the inevitable follow-up to this adventure, hopefully reuniting the script and art droids together to create a thrilling sequel - TITAN 2: Enceladus!



ULYSSES SWEET, MANIAC FOR HIRE - CENTRED (Part 9)
Script - Guy Adams
Art - Paul Marshall
Greytones - Chris Blythe
Letters - Ellie de Ville

This episode seemed to showcase more similarities between Marvel Comics’ Deadpool and Ulysses Sweet, with the Maniac for Hire displaying an equally indestructible nature (albeit without a healing factor) as well as possessing the same knack for unpredictable chaos that turns out to be planned way in advance and resolving the threat in a strange savant-esque manner.


Despite an enjoyable final episode, the overall story-arc did feel like it dragged on for too long in the middle, with a minor pay-off in the end. I would like to see more from the character, with the same creative team, but in much smaller chunks or with better pacing. The final tease suggests a rough idea for future stories with the focus back on the relationship between Sweet and his psyche-chip, which happened to be the most interesting element of the strip.



THE A.B.C WARRIORS - RETURN TO MARS (Part 8)
Script - Pat Mills
Art - Clint Langley
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

After abstaining from helping the young Martian boy last episode, Tubal Caine recants his decision and rescues the outcast in a rather stylish gunfight against the mutated clans-folk, adopting the young boy as his ‘son’. I’m continuing to enjoy these short stories of Tubal’s past, although I am getting confused as to where we are in the timeline. I’m assuming this is the most recent flashback, prior to the framing sequence that kicked off this story-arc.

The final panel suggests a visit from Howard Quartz, the owner of Ro-Busters, which like Mek-Quake and Ro-Jaws in the earlier episodes, is a nice nostalgic blast from the past. I have no clue what the current status is with the character, only being familiar with his appearances in those very early Ro-Busters episodes, but if I recall he was a particularly scheming and greedy character, so his presence is likely to bust up Tubal Caine’s happy family.



GREY AREA - RATES OF EXCHANGE (Part 1)
Script - Dan Abnett
Art - Patrick Goddard
Colours - Abigail Ryder
Letters - Ellie de Ville

After a more diplomatic approach in its last story, this week’s Grey Area kicks off with an action-packed alien attack in one of the facility’s currency booths with an HR Giger-esque Alien creature ripping apart the cashier and customer in a particularly gory manner, skilfully depicted by Patrick Goddard. The team manage to subdue the threat after some minor difficulty, thanks to a well-aimed shot by Birdy. What intrigues me is the mysterious woman who appears after the conflict, claiming that the reason behind the alien attacks is due to money. My initial instinct was that the creature was somehow borne out of the alien currency in the booths, but it’s more likely that this is a financially motivated attack. Even so, it’s an effective cliff-hanger and piques my interest to find out what is behind the threat.

As I've said before, this series really benefits from its episodic structure to the stories, featuring a change of pace with each chapter. I also love the dynamic between the team members, who are getting fleshed out with each additional story-arc. The fact that each new story manages to be accessible and yet advance the on-going adventures of the team is a wonderful balancing act, expertly handled by Dan Abnett.



STRONTIUM DOG: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JOHNNY ALPHA - DOGS OF WAR (Part 9)
Script - John Wagner
Art - Carlos Ezquerra
Letters - Simon Bowland

The Ikan soon make their presence felt in the war, demonstrating the fear-inducing knack of resurrecting themselves, even after being beheaded. With more mutant troops falling to this latest batch of reinforcements, Johnny and Middenface make a last-ditch attack on the Government headquarters in order to bring the war to a rapid conclusion.


I like the eerie design of the Ikan, who look somewhat like Raiden from Mortal Kombat attending some Gothic S+M party. I’m not entirely sure about their invulnerability as it seems to transcend the strip’s status quo of mutations and aliens into something more mystical and godly, but considering this whole adventure begun with Johnny Alpha resurrected from the dead, I guess I can’t cry foul about enemies that do the same.

With Tharg’s announcement that next Prog will feature the final episode of the ‘Life and Death of Johnny Alpha’ storyline that has been running on and off since 2010’s Prog 1689, there is a slight feeling of dread surrounding the conclusion to the story-arc, which might see the end of either Middenface or Johnny Alpha himself. While it might be a bold move to kill off the character after making the effort to resurrect him, it would be John Wagner’s chance to write his own swansong for the character.



OVERALL THOUGHTS / NEXT WEEK:

With both Judge Dredd: Titan and Ulysses Sweet, there will be a slight shake-up of the structure of next week’s Prog, which also happens to be the 37th birthday anniversary. With the gap left by Ulysses Sweet, we might see either a Tharg the Mighty anniversary story, or perhaps a double-sized Strontium Dog, especially if we’re going to get a fairly dramatic conclusion as promised this week.


The physical edition of 2000AD Prog 1869 will be available in stores on Wednesday 19th February - Digital copies of this Prog will be available on the same day through the 2000AD app, which can be downloaded onto iOS devices from here.

Keep checking back each week for more reviews and features about 2000AD, the Galaxy's Greatest Comic! Remember to leave your comments below, or contact me on Twitter or through my Facebook page!

Wednesday, 12 February 2014

2000AD Prog 1868

Prog 1868 Cover by Clint Langley

This week's cover features what appears to be a mix of Clint Langley's art styles – hand-drawn with a hint of CGI texturing. I really like the design with the broken remains of the A.B.C Warriors at the bottom of Tubal Caine's feet and by blending his two artistic styles, Clint Langley has produced a much clearer image than his purely computer-generated covers.


JUDGE DREDD - TITAN (Part 7)
Script - Rob Williams
Art - Henry Flint
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

This was a fantastic penultimate episode that nicely set up the events for next week's finale, with a nifty 'Chekhov's Gun' in the form of the remote detonator to the explosives on the two space-crafts. I wonder if Dredd will activate the bombs, preventing Nixon and the others from escaping Titan, leaving them stranded on the desolate planet. I loved the final panel with Dredd pleading for help from Gerhart, which served to highlight how much Nixon and the prisoners had broken him down.


I have no clue how this will end next week and where the pieces will fall, with a potential shift in the series' status quo regarding Titan. It could be that we might also see the end of some long-term characters, such as Amy Nixon and former Chief Judge Sinfield. It's also likely that this story has merely been the setup for a much longer-running plot with the Titan prisoners remaining an ongoing threat to Mega City One, returning to menace the Judges during their weakest moments.



ULYSSES SWEET, MANIAC FOR HIRE - CENTRED (Part 8)
Script - Guy Adams
Art - Paul Marshall
Greytones - Chris Blythe
Letters - Ellie de Ville

This week saw the penultimate episode of Ulysses Sweet, which after a shocking final panel, added a nice 'spanner in the works' of what I expected to be a fairly 'by-the-numbers' predictable conclusion. The episode delivered upon the long build-up between the space pirates and the Maniac-for-hire, seeing them trading blows with each other, amidst the graphic hyper-violence of a man having his head punched open by a bionic fist and a dog escaping with a bunch of testicles in its mouth.


I'm really looking forward to seeing how this concludes and this is the first episode since the opening installment that has me eager to see where the story is going. If Ulysses Sweet is to return to 2000AD in the future, then I would suggest it comes back in smaller, bite-size chunks that condense his madness and focus more on him as the central character, rather than placing him off-centre and as a supporting role within his own strip.



THE A.B.C WARRIORS - RETURN TO MARS (Part 7)
Script - Pat Mills
Art - Clint Langley
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

I must admit that I expected a change of focus in the storytelling once The A.B.C. Warriors had returned after its one-week hiatus, however, the story seems to be continuing its retrospective look at Harry Shrapnel’s past with another untold tale, illustrating the character’s struggle with his pacifist role and reluctance to become involved with the A.B.C. Warriors again. I can see this being a frustration with readers who want the story to advance in the present day, rather than repeating the same message through a variety of vignettes.

Clint Langley returns to his penciled artwork again to illustrate this latest chapter, leaving me somewhat confused as to the reasoning behind the switches in art styles, as there doesn't appear to be an in-story reason for the distinctions. I do enjoy the level of detail that his pencils bring to the characters moreso than the realistic textures from his computer-assisted artwork, so I am glad that he has returned to this technique for the next couple of chapters, presumably he will return to the CGI artwork once the story returns to the present.



GREY AREA - ALL GOD'S CHILDREN (Part 3)
Script - Dan Abnett
Art - Patrick Goddard
Colours - Abigail Ryder
Letters - Ellie de Ville

Only upon re-reading the story as a whole, I realised that this incident was a way for Dan Abnett to compare this diplomatic incident against Bulliet's actions against the Uuveth, adding to the tapestry of the continuity of the series through a stand-alone tale. It was vitally important for Kymn to resolve this incident through non-violence as the ETC couldn't handle another diplomatic disaster.


Taken on its own merits, the storyline is engaging and entertaining, but for long-term readers who recognise the subtext in the conversation between Bulliet and Delgado, there is a richer layer of storytelling there. This captures exactly how enjoyable I've found this series as it continues to tell stories on multiple levels, appealing to both new and older readers with its loosely connected story-arcs.



STRONTIUM DOG: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JOHNNY ALPHA - DOGS OF WAR (Part 8)
Script - John Wagner
Art - Carlos Ezquerra
Letters - Simon Bowland

This chapter saw the mutants continue to make movement towards the Government, capitalising on their win against the Norm Brotherhood last episode, and their tactics seem to be having the desired effect with the Americans pulling out of the war to return to their own problems overseas. It seems that despite heavy losses in the Mutant Army that a victory is in sight, until the final page reveals that there is a final set of reinforcements to the cause - the mysterious looking Ikan. I'm not familiar with the Ikan, but they certainly look foreboding and despite their small numbers, I have the horrible feeling that they will provide some obstacle to the Mutant army in the final days of the war.



OVERALL THOUGHTS / NEXT WEEK:

Next Prog sees the finales for Judge Dredd and Ulysses Sweet, and I'm looking forward to the conclusions of both stories, and I'm interested to see which strip will be following Ulysses Sweet – possibly Sinister Dexter, or maybe a Tharg's 3rillers? The next 'jumping-on' point is expected to be Prog 1874, so there's still a fair few installments of the other stories left to go.


The physical edition of 2000AD Prog 1868 will be available in stores on Wednesday 12th February - Digital copies of this Prog will be available on the same day through the 2000AD app, which can be downloaded onto iOS devices from here.

Keep checking back each week for more reviews and features about 2000AD, the Galaxy's Greatest Comic! Remember to leave your comments below, or contact me on Twitter or through my Facebook page!

Wednesday, 5 February 2014

2000AD Prog 1867

Prog 1867 Cover by Mark Harrison

Initially I was struck by the composition of this front cover and how it blended the action of the Strontium Dogs firing their weapons, against the background of the plummeting hoverbuggy. However, upon closer look it does feel like there's a bit too much happening on the page, and I'm not quite sure about the way Johnny is holding his pistol. It looks like he has his shoulders hunched up and doesn't feel like a natural pose compared to that of the other Strontium Dogs underneath him. The cover does manage to convey the frenzied action of the second Mutant War, but I feel like it might have been more effective without Johnny Alpha dominating the image and overshadowing the logo.


JUDGE DREDD - TITAN (Part 6)
Script - Rob Williams
Art - Henry Flint
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

This episode of Judge Dredd: Titan revealed the motivation behind the prison riot through a series of flashbacks showing how Amy Nixon went from making a deal with the Justice Department, to ending up in Titan anyway when the Chaos Bug hit. I really liked the twist that former Chief Judge Sinfield is actually innocent and not a part of the riots, representing those criminals who wish to serve their time in peace, presenting Hershey with a more difficult decision regarding Titan. It’s a complex situation and I’m intrigued to see if the Judges are prepared to let Titan exist as its own entity, separate from the jurisdiction of Mega City One. With only two episodes to go, I wouldn’t be surprised if this issue isn’t wrapped up in this story and instead fuels a larger story-arc with Titan becoming an on-going threat under the leadership of Amy Nixon.


The panel showcasing the extent of Gerhart’s damage seemed a bit excessive with what appeared to be half of his face missing. Hopefully an extended look at the character in the next installment will give a clearer view of his condition, but it looked a bit unrealistic that he might be able to mount a rescue with half of his body missing. I’m quite fond of the character, and his determination to see Dredd pay for his ‘war crimes’ in a court of law, even going so far as to save the character’s life twice now, however, could this be third time unlucky?



ULYSSES SWEET, MANIAC FOR HIRE - CENTRED (Part 7)
Script - Guy Adams
Art - Paul Marshall
Greytones - Chris Blythe
Letters - Ellie de Ville

With the death and destruction escalating in the Amethyst Cluster, the rest of the supporting cast are looking towards the now-vegetative Ulysses Sweet to rescue them from the chaos. This week's installment takes a trip into the Maniac-For-Hire's brain, with an hilarious two-page homage to Rupert the Bear, using the same template and style of the classic Daily Express comic strip, even down to the inclusion of the prose descriptions at the bottom.


Even though this episode didn't really advance the story from the preceding week, I must admit that I enjoyed the visual homage to Rupert the Bear so much that I am prepared to let it slide on that point. It does look like we're set to get some development in the next installment, however, with Ulysses finally coming face to stapled face with the pirates who have orchestrated this whole scheme in order to obtain the diamond-shaped planetoid.



FUTURE SHOCKS - FAMILY BUSINESS
Script - Gary Simpson
Art - Eoin Coveney
Letters - Annie Parkhouse

This Future Shock from newcomers, Gary Simpson and Eoin Coveney, features the intriguing concept of soldiers travelling back in time to past wars in order to satisfy their bloodlust, with a compelling mystery centred around the protagonist seemingly killing versions of himself throughout time. I really enjoyed the set-up towards the twist, but the actual twist felt a bit off, and I had a hard time following the logic of the character’s revelation that it was his children he was killing, especially since it seemed like it was established that the timeline was constantly updating and shifting due to the actions in the past.

Despite the shaky twist, I found the story very enjoyable and Gary Simpson managed to craft an intriguing mystery amongst the fun concept, and I look forward to seeing more Future Shocks from him. The artwork by Eoin Coveney was top-notch, evoking memories of Chris Weston, with some expressive faces and strong linework. Overall, it was a pretty strong first showing in the Prog, with a minor quibble on the ending.



GREY AREA - ALL GOD'S CHILDREN (Part 2)
Script - Dan Abnett
Art - Patrick Goddard
Colours - Abigail Ryder
Letters - Ellie de Ville

After the attack on the charity aid worker, the ETC team are faced with the decision to react with violence or to employ a more diplomatic approach. Through negotiation between the Rookuk and Kymn, the gifted member of the team who is able to speak any alien languages within his proximity, the ETC troops learn that the outburst of violence is due to a religious disagreement. Rather than having a different God, the Rookuk have no Gods, as they view them as embodiments of hate, marking a different spin on the traditional religious intolerance storyline.


It's interesting to see a different tactic at work here, rather than resorting straight to violence. The mix of action and strategy has been evident throughout the story, with certain events calling for different approaches, such as the cavity searches in a prior episode. This mixed bag of storytelling helps the series feel fresh, with each successive chapter having a different feel to its predecessor.



STRONTIUM DOG: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JOHNNY ALPHA - DOGS OF WAR (Part 7)
Script - John Wagner
Art - Carlos Ezquerra
Letters - Simon Bowland

After last week's episode, I was expecting a bitter battle between the two leaders of the opposing factions: Dad Nabbett and Johnny Alpha, but instead we got a different ending for the Norm Brotherhood leader, with many of the mutants lending their weapons to destroying his hoverbuggy, showing a unified effort by the mutant army. I liked how this victory was depicted as a team effort, rather than continuing to make Johnny Alpha into a messianic hero.

High on the victory against the Brotherhood, the mutants overcame the blockades at Ongar and liberated some substantial amounts of weaponry from the Brotherhood's stash. It looks like the war is coming to a conclusion, with the teaser for next episode labelled as, 'The Last Battle', implying success for the mutants. I'm interested to see what occurs as a result of a mutant victory and how this will set up future chapters of the Strontium Dog series.



OVERALL THOUGHTS / NEXT WEEK:

Overall, this was a pretty good Prog, although I did notice the absence of The A.B.C Warriors – it feels like the bulk of the stories are coming to a close, with Titan heading towards a last-ditch rescue by Gerhart, the Stronts are making their play for the ‘last battle’ of the second Mutant War, and Ulysses Sweet is finally getting his senses together. I’m looking forward to seeing a fresh wave of thrills, with Sinister Dexter promised in Spring and possibly some shorter, less grim stories for Judge Dredd too. The old man needs a rest, Tharg!


The physical edition of 2000AD Prog 1867 will be available in stores on Wednesday 5th February - Digital copies of this Prog will be available on the same day through the 2000AD app, which can be downloaded onto iOS devices from here.

Keep checking back each week for more reviews and features about 2000AD, the Galaxy's Greatest Comic! Remember to leave your comments below, or contact me on Twitter or through my Facebook page!
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